What do You Bid II by Fernando Lema

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During this week I received a second bidding problem. For this opportunity I invited to answer three close friends…

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Buenos Aires, Julio 11th 2014

Fernando Lema

Fernando Lema

During this week I received a second bidding problem. For this opportunity I invited to answer three close friends, all members of the “Great American Bridge Tour“.

 This is the hand:

8 4 A K 6 A K 5 3 2 7 4 3

 And this is the bidding:

Dealer South N/S Vul

West North East South
      1
Pass 2 Pass 2
Pass ?    

And this is what they asked me; What does North rebid should be?

First Answer: Jade Barrett (U.S.A.)

2014 Bermuda Regional GS Jade Barrett

2014 Bermuda Regional,
Expert Lecture by GS Jade Barrett

Jade Barrett (U.S.A.):  “Tournament Bridge Services, LLC” CEO, the biggest Bridge Professionals Association in the world. He also is part of the “Great American Bridge Tour”. Founder of the North American Youth Bridge Foundation,  CSBNews.org correspondent in USA, and an incredible friend!

His Answer: 3. My first thought is to bid 3,  for two reasons.

  1: First and foremost, I know what I do not want to bid. I do not want to show a club stopper by bidding 2NT. I do not want to bid 2 and suggest three card support. Since he has only promised 4 I cannot safely raise to 3, despite holding A K x. Rebidding 3 shows six, so that is not an option, either.

 That leaves me with:
 
 2: Bidding 3 allows my partner to continue with the description of his hand – does he have 5? Does he have 3? Does he want to play 3NT from his side?
 
 To my way of thinking, all hands are either “Telling” or “Asking”. 
 
When I cannot adequately describe my hand, I need to have partner show me theirs. This style of cooperative communication allows for both partners to be well placed to make decisions. As I have played more and more hands, I have discovered that there are more Telling hands then I can once thought – or perhaps I have matured enough to realize that I should not always have the final say!

Second Answer: Karen Lee Barrett

Karen Lee Barrett

Karen Lee Barrett

Karen Lee Barrett (U.S.A.) (ACBL Grand Life Master). Karen begun to play bridge tournaments in 1969, she won her first National in 1984 and is one of the 307 GLM players in activity.

His Answer: 3

 Raising or rebidding  is out of the question.

I don’t care for 2 because I think that it shows active support, not just tolerance.

While I don’t like 3 with less than 4, bidding 2NT could be snatching defeat from the jaws of victory. I choose 3 as the least of evils and the most flexible/non-committal call.

Third Answer: Björgvin Kristinsson

Björgvin Kristinsson

Björgvin Kristinsson

Björgvin Kristinsson (ICeland): For most of his friends “Bennie”. He is a young bridge professional who emigrated from Iceland to USA few years ago and  today plays at the highest bridge level. He is also a member of  the “Great American Bridge Tour” and a great partner!

His Answer: 2

I would bid 2 because that saves room exploring the right contract. 
 
Not 2NT I do not have a club stopper.
 
Not 3 that is natural in a two over one auction unless you have an agreement that it is not!
 
Not 3 do not have 6 or 5 excellent diamonds. 
 
I know i should have 3 spades but if we always have the perfect hand bridge would not be so fun.

Esta entrada también está disponible en: Spanish

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