Those Extra Chances in Bridge

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Sometimes it is not easy to work out the only distriburion fo the adverse cards that will provide a chance for the contract.

Reese y Trezel
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Sometimes it is not easy to work out the only distriburion fo the adverse cards that will provide a chance for the contract. South had a plan of sorts on the deal below, but at best he was dependidng on a defensive error.

   K 7 3
 Q 9 7 6 2
 7 2
 10 9 8 
 
   
  
   
              
    
  
   
               
   A 4 2
 K 8
 A K 4
 A J 5 3 2
 

The Bidding did not take long:

Dador: North;  All Vulnerables

Oeste    Norte      Este      Sur
       Pass      Pass      1
1      1      Pass      3NT
Pass      Pass      Pass       
Pass      Pass      Pass  
       

Contract: 3NT

Lead: Q

North’s free bid of one heart, on his moderate values, was very questionable. When West led and North had to expose his dummy, he came out with the old bromide “Not much, partner, but I had passed orifinally “.

There was not much point in the holding off the first diamond; it might even be a mistake to let the defence switch to spades with a trick in the bag. South won the diamond lead, therefore, and considered his prospects

There was a reasonable chance to make four tricks in clubs. With two entries to dummy, declarer could take two finesses; with only one entry, he could lead low from hand, playing West for Q x or K x.

But four clubs, two diamonds and two spades would add up to only eight tricks. Having concluded that he would need at least one trick from hearts; South led the K at trick two. He hoped that the defence, seeing the heart suit in dummy, would allow the K to hold.

West captured the A at once, however, and cleared the diamonds. Whether he played on hearts or clubs now, South could make only eight tricks.

Since his aim was to slip through just one trick in hearts, South should have thought of leading a low heart at trick two.

As it happens, this play confronts the defence with a dilemma to which there is no answer. If West plays low, South wins with the Q in dummy and switches to clubs, establishing four tricks in the suit; if West goes up with the A to clear the diamonds, then South can make four tricks in hearts, which also in enough for his contract.

The complete hand: 

   K 7 3
 Q 9 7 6 2
 7 2
 10 9 8 
 
 J 10 5 
 A J 5
 Q J 10 9 5 
 Q 4
   Q 9 8 6
 10 4 3
 8 6 3 
 K 7 6
   A 4 2
 K 8
 A K 4
 A J 5 3 2
 

Esta entrada también está disponible en: Spanish

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