Reverse Bid is Explained by Oswald jacoby

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One of the most difficult points of bidding for the player who wants to move into the expert class is the “reverse” bid.

By Ana Roth
On 20 August, 2015 At 14:19

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Oswald Jacoby
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The Telegraph – 27 Oct 1964

Albert Hodges Morehead

Albert Hodges Morehead

One of the most difficult points of bidding for the player who wants to move into the expert class is the “reverse” bid. Al Morehead points out that a ‘reverse” bid is the naming of a new suit which makes it impossible for partner to go back to your first suit at the lowest possible level.

Thus in the partnership sequence—one club, one heart, two diamonds — the opening bidder has reversed since he has made it impossible for the hand to play at two clubs.aa

The bidding of today’s hand ilustrates a typical misunderstanding of just what a reverse bid is and isn’t. North misunderstood, but his unfortunate partner had to share the loss with him.

Lead: clubK

There was nothing wrong with South’s diamond opening or with North’s bid of two hearts after West overcalled two bids, but the two heart bid put pressure on South.

He had to find some rebid and he made the cheapest possible call of two spades. This sent North into orbit he bid four no trump to ask for aces and after South showed one ace, North contracted for the spade slam.

Poor South had to lose one club and one heart and when spades failed to break he was down two. North said, “Partner! How could you reverse with a minimum hand?” Of course, South had not reversed. North’s two-heart bid had shut out two diamonds. South’s two-spade bid was merely the lowest bid he could make and merely showed four spades in addition to his diamond suit.

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