Reading the Discard by Alfred Sheinwold

Print Friendly

You could easily make today’s hand. Just as U.S. expert Jeff Meckstroth did in the recent world championship. But Meckstroth had to do it without seeing the East-West cards.

Jeff Meckstroth
Print Friendly

The Dispatch – Jan 19, 1982

You could easily make today’s hand. Just as U.S. expert Jeff Meckstroth did in the recent world championship. But Meckstroth had to do it without seeing the East-West cards.

aa

Lead: clubQ

Meckstroth took the first club and won a diamond finesse with dummy’s queen of diamonds. If south next led de diamondA y diamond, East would win the third diamond and lead hearts. Instead, Meckstroth wisely led a low diamond from dummy since West’s club length made him more likely than his Partner to have only two diamonds.

CASUAL DISCARD

West won and led another club to the ace. East casually discarded a spade, trying to look like a man who didn’t have the queen of spades, but Meckstroth was not deceived.

Since East had started with only three diamonds and one club he had nine cards in the major suits. It was a good bet that East would discard first from his longer suit.

After running the diamonds Meckstroth, backed his judgement by taking the ace of spades and finessing through East for the queen of spades.

Esta entrada también está disponible en: Spanish

Comments are closed.