Opponents Often Lose with Their Big Hands By A. Sheinwold

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A player isn’t lucky to get high cards unless he knows what to do with them.

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The Morning Record – 14 Dic 1971 By Alfred Sheinwold

South dealer Both sides vulnerable

If you see a man weeping in the street, buy him a cup of coffee and speak to him comfortingly. All men are brothers. But if he is weeping only because his opponents get all the high cards, snatch the coffee away from him. In the first place, he gets as many high cards as his opponents: and in the second place his opponents will often mess up their big hands. Today’s hand shows the general idea.

Opening lead — J

South took the ace of clubs, drew two rounds of trumps, cashed the ace of hearts and ruffed in dummy. Then he laid out the ace and king of diamonds. When West couldn’t follow suit to the second round of diamonds, South was helpless. Down one. Don’t waste any tears on South. His slam was unbeatable, if he played it correctly regardless of how the East-West cards were divided.

After drawing two round of trumps. South should lead out the ace and king of diamonds, if the suit breaks normally, he can give up one diamond and claim the rest. Assume, therefore, that the suit breaks badly.

EITHER WAY

If West is short in diamonds, as in the actual hand, declarer leads dummy’s singleton heart and tries a finesse with the queen. If the finesse works, South is home. If the finesse loses, West’s return gives South the contract. A heart return gives declarer a free finesse, a club return gives south a ruff-and-sluff.

Next, assume, that East is the defender who is short in diamonds. Declarer discovers this on the second round of diamond-ace of hearts and leads the queen of hearts for a ruffing finesse. If West plays a low heart, declarer discards a diamond from dummy.

Even if East turns up with the king of hearts (imagine the East-West hands exchanged), he must return either a heart or a club. A heart return ssets up the ten or nine of hearts for South: and he will later discard dummy’s remaining diamond on it. A club return allows South to ruff while dummy stuffs the last diamond. A player isn’t lucky to get high cards unless he knows what to do with them.

 

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