Easley Blackwood…Bridge

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As soon as a hand is played, Mr. Heinsite whips into his analysis, usually pointing out something his partner should have done to get a better result on the deal.

By Ana Roth
On 28 March, 2017 At 13:53

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Schenectady Gazette – 1 Jul 1953

As soon as a hand is played, Mr. Heinsite whips into his analysis, usually pointing out something his partner should have done to get a better result on the deal. Often these criticisms go unchallenged—especially when the partner is Mr. Meek or Mr. Abel. Mr. Meek hates an argument and is eager to get on to the next hand. Mr. Abel doesn’t think as fast as Mr. Heinsite and often fails to see the flaw in the latter’s remarks.

WITH MR. CHAMPION, It’s different. He loves an argument. And he thinks even faster than Mr. Heinsite. It is foolhardy indeed to criticize Mr. Champion’s bidding or play.

SOUTH DEALER. Neither side vulnerable.

In today’s hand Mr. Abel led the king of spades. Mr. Heinsite over-took with the ace and returned the trey. Mr. Champion played the seven and Mr. Abel won with the 10. He led back the queen, dummy ruffed with the nine of hearts end Mr. Heinsite overrated with the jack. Mr. Heinsite shifted to the deuce of diamonds. Mr. Champion had to find a way to prevent the loss of a club trick. He won the fourth trick with the king of diamonds. He cashed the we and king of trumps. Next he led to the ace of diamonds, returned a diamond and ruffed it.

Now he led the rest of his hearts. On the last heart Mr. Heinsite was squeezed. Dummy’s last three cards were the eight of diamonds and the king-nine of clubs, Mr. Heinsite had to play the 10th trick holding the jack of diamonds and three clubs to tho queen. Obviously he had to hold his diamond, so ho lot go a club. Mr. Champion then led to the king of clubs, back to his ace and the four of clubs won the last trick.

“IF YOU’D RETURNED the deuce of spades at trick three. Abel,” said Mr. Heinsite, “that would have told me to return a club and a club return would have killed the squeeze.”

Mr. Abel was silent but Mr. Champion was not. “Don’t be silly, Heinsite,” he said. “If you lead a club at trick four, I win with the ace and cash four hearts, leaving in dummy four diamonds and the king of clubs. What would you hold for your last five cards””

“Three diamonds and two clubs,” answered Mr, Heinsite, uncertainly”…

All right. Then I play king and ace of diamonds and trump a diamond. Dummy’s, eight of diamonds would then be good and I could get to it with king of clubs.”

“I don’t mind your analyses—but try to be right once in awhile.”

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