Doubles by Roger Lee Part 1

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This lesson is for intermediate-advanced level. In many cases, this is going to fly against what old-fashioned textbooks about bridge have to say.

Roger Lee
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Fuente: BBO NEWS

NOTE: This lesson is for intermediate-advanced level. In many cases, this is going to fly against what old-fashioned textbooks about bridge have to say. I don”t mind this, and I don”t mind if you do not adopt what I have to say. It”s more important to listen to the thought process and decide what style of bridge you would like to play. The most important thing about bidding is to keep an open mind. Bridge has changed a lot in the last 30 years. For me (as you will see), my preferred style happens to be a very aggressive style where I like to bid on lots of hands.

In this series I”ll be discussing “doubles” in various situations. It became obvious that I couldn”t fit everything what I wanted to say in one lecture, so this will be the first of a multi-part series.

I think everyone here knows that the south hand is a takeout double of 1.

I will try not to spend too much time on hands like this. Instead, I will try to go over my thought process in a lot of situations where I find the decision to be close. In many cases, this is going to fly against what old-fashioned textbooks about bridge have to say. I don”t mind this, and I don”t mind if you do not adopt what I have to say. It”s more important to listen to the thought process and decide what style of bridge you would like to play. The most important thing about casino online bidding is to keep an open mind.

Bridge has changed a lot in the last 30 years. For me (as you will see), my preferred style happens to be a very aggressive style where I like to bid on lots of hands. I will try to get to three topics and then answer some questions in this lecture. They are:

  1. direct seat doubles
  2. balancing doubles
  3. bidding over preempts

1. Direct seat doubles
Everyone “knows” what a direct seat takeout double looks like – short in opening bidder”s suit, and support for all unbid suits. But if you look at top players today, you will notice that they don”t need quite as much as the textbooks suggest to make a direct seat takeout double.

Here is a hand from recent play (my district GNT qualifier) where a questionable takeout double was made (try not to laugh!)

I”m not saying this is a great takeout double, but I did make one at the table. To me this hand captures a lot of what bridge is about. After a (very) thin double by south, west and north make their normal bids. Click the NEXT button in the diagram to follow the play.

East has a normal, in my opinion, A lead to look at the dummy. Careful play results in this pretty endposition where east has no good play. A heart concedes a ruff/sluff, a club concedes a trick, and a diamond also gives up a trick (west cannot ruff profitably, he is endplayed if he does).

That”s not what happened at the table though. Worrying that his partner”s values were mostly in hearts and that it would be too difficult to defeat 4, east (correctly in my opinion) took out insurance at the 5 level, with a reasonable expectation that it would be -300 into a vulnerable game. This was NS 500 on routine defense:

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