Posts by Hands 2

Montecatini 2017: By Luck Montecatini has a cure for Stress

By Ana Roth • 10 June, 2017

For true bridge players there is no activity that absorbs them in the way bridge does. But on the way to satisfaction, during the championships there are …

Bridge play comes naturally

By Ana Roth • 9 April, 2017

Many players think that only experts can make contracts using a squeeze. Actually, many squeezes “play themselves,” emerging without any clever play.

The almost anonymous partner By Charles Goren

By Charles Goren • 2 April, 2017

cartoon tatuaje

The margin of victory was 79 points, so this deal was hardly the crux of the match, but it involved an extremely rare kind of play—a “one-suit squeeze.”

A sample of Brilliance By Omar Sharif

By Ana Roth • 22 March, 2017

Take a vote among the world’s experts for their choice of No. 1 in the world, and you will find Norway’s Geir Helgemo heading many lists. Here is a sample of his brilliance.

Theoretical Winners and Losers

By Ana Roth • 13 March, 2017

One of East’s winners vanishes.

The Grand Coup by E. P. C. Cotter

By ferlema • 12 March, 2017

einstein-counting-on-fingers

The only thing that distinguished a grand coup from its humbler brother, the coup, is that in the reducing play it is winners instead of losers that are ruffed.

Elimination Play by E. P. C. Cotter

By ferlema • 9 March, 2017

Edmond Patrick Charles Cotter

Elimination really refers to the stripping process preceding the endplay, but as it is also loosely apllied to the endplay itself, I have left it as the chapter heading.

Attacking the Danger Hand by Terence Reese

By Terence Reese • 3 March, 2017

On many no trump hands declarer has to force out two defensive winners before he can run his tricks. It may be essential to force out those winners in the right order.

A Most Unusual Defensive Hand By Arthur Robbins

By Ana Roth • 24 February, 2017

Bridge is a great, but unpredictable game. You hold:

The Plan XXXIV by Tim Bourke

By Tim Bourke • 17 February, 2017

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This was a seemingly routine board in a team match.
At both tables, West led the ten of hearts. Each declarer
won the first trick with ace of hearts,