Bridge Philosophy By Alfred Sheinwold

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A philosopher may spend his whole life distinguishing between the important and the unimportant. Bridge players have a simple test: important tricks are those that have a bearing on the contract; all others are unimportant.

Norman Kay Alfred Sheinwold and Eddie Kantar
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The Dispatch – 10 Dic 1982

A philosopher may spend his whole life distinguishing between the important and the unimportant. Bridge players have a simple test: important tricks are those that have a bearing on the contract; all others are unimportant.

North dealer Both sides vulnerable

Opening lead:  9

When declarer plays a low spade from dummy at the first trick, East has his chance to distinguish between philosophy and bridge. East may play the ten since he will then be in position to take two spade tricks whenever spades are led again.

YEARS MAY PASS

The trouble is that years may pass before spades are led again. South wins the first spade, takes the club finesse at once, wins the diamond return with the ace, and runs 10 tricks. If East is a philosophical bridge player he knows that spade tricks have no bearing on the contract. His only chance to defeat the contract is to go up with the ace of spades and shift to the ten of diamonds. Now the defenders defeat the contract by getting three diamonds and a club in addition to the ace of spades.

bridge-sacrificio

 

Esta entrada también está disponible en: Spanish

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