Bridge & Humor: An innocent question by Sam Leckie

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In the late Sixties and Seventies, Dorothy Hayden was in many eyes the best woman player in the world. Photo: Garozzo-Hayden-Vigyan Gupta- Katherine Wei, Belladonna

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In the late Sixties and Seventies, Dorothy Hayden was in many eyes the best woman player in the world.

Dorothy Truscott, was attending the Hammamet,Tunisia 1997 Championships where she was a contestant in the Transnational Open Pairs.

In the Press Room the other day I reminded her of the time I played against her more than 20 years ago in the World Pairs. I was about to remind her of a hand she played when she stopped me in my tracks and said, “I remember you now.You’ve changed in size a little but you’re rolling Scottish accent hasn’t. I bet you’re going to tell me about a 6 I played.”

I was quite amazed that she remembered.

With no other losers she had to play 6 with J 5 opposite A K 8 7 6 3.The correct percentage play is low to the jack. If this loses you cash the ace and king an 85% chance.

However, without hesitation Dorothy led the jack from dummy. I covered with the queen. She returned to dummy and passed the 5 bingo!

I held Q 10 9 4, so the contract was made.

I knew who she was, and I could not fathom why she played against the odds. When play was over I asked her why.

She answered politely, “Did you not notice that your partner asked if I had opened 1? If he had held the queen he would have remembered that fact. Knowing you had the queen, the rest was easy.”

That’s what champions are made up.

Esta entrada también está disponible en: Spanish

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